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, but there will be overflow rooms with tvs. this is must see tv today for all of britain and elsewhere. as one politician here put it, the three musketeers of the murdoch media empire and that phone hacking scandal will appear later today. now, they'll be grilled by ten members of a select committee on media. these hearings will only last for an hour. murdoch and another hour for rebecca brooks, who was the chief executive of murdoch's british holdings until she resigned last week. now, members of parliament will try to get the murdochs and brooks to commit themselves to say things on record that could be used against them later. especially if what they say turns out to be misleading. they will be speaking on oath, but on honor. the murdochs and rebecca brooks, on the other hand, will likely try to be as contrite as possible. it's been their strategy of late. apologize, apologize, apologize. no doubt, there will be questions specifically to james murdoch, who had admitted to giving phone hacking victims huge payouts. over $1 million each back in 2008 to buy their silence. we're sure he will be questioned abou
fought so hard the leave britain because of their unaccountable imperial leadership. now look at us. [bleeped]. laftd laughter we'll be right back. >> jon: welcome back. you know, with all this hullabaloo of what's going on, i have neglected to mention last week's women's world cup. our u.s. team unbelievable. up believable. ultimately they lost in the final to japan, but their play throughout the tournament was outstanding, and as a former player and sometimes lady, the goal that they scored in injury time against brazil to tie one of the greatest goals i've ever seen in world cup history. take a look. >> a pinot gets across towards wambach. can you believe it? abby wambach has saved the u.s.a.'s life in this world cup. >> jon: wambach, goooooalllllll. you know what, though, i got to tell you, it's not the same when you see it in the highlight as seeing it live. to see it... excuse me for a minute. i'm just going to... to my changing closet. [laughter] hey, hey, everyone. hey, ladies. >> just ignore him. >> oh, is he coming this way? >> ladies, here's what i want. i want brazil inj
two of britain's top cops and still threatening even the prime minister david cameron. >> head of scotland yard stepped down amid public outrage yesterday. >> stephen: big deal. who cares if the head of scotland yard resigns. why is scotland yard policing england anyway? call me when the head of england yard resigns. that's news. now thankfully, folks, there is a voice of reason out there. boston friend steve doocy who last friday blew the lid back on to this story with some pr guy who may or may not be employed by rupert murdoch. jimmy, pitch me off a deuce. >> what do you make of what this particular hacking scandal with the news of the world. >> the "news of the world" is a hacking scandal t can't be denied but the issue really is why are so many people piling on at this point. >> avenue's got some serious problems in this country right now. we are teetering on default with. what do they do. they talk about this. >> we know it is a hacking scandal. shouldn't we get beyond it and really deal with the issue of hacking? i mean citicorp has been hacked into. bank of america has
britain because of their unaccountable imperial leadership. now look at us. [bleeped]. laftd laughter we'll be right back. [ wind howl] hello. release mountain freshness. fabio. surprise. it's you. old spice matterhorn. fabio. matterhorn. [ laughs ] [ old spice whistle ] [ man ] i got this new citi thankyou card and started earning loads of points. you got a weather balloon with points? yes i did. [ man ] points i could use for just about anything. ♪ ♪ there it is. [ man ] so i used mine to get a whole new perspective. ♪ [ male announcer ] the new citi thankyou premier card gives you more ways to earn points. what's your story? citi can help you write it. >> jon: welcome back. you know, with all this hullabaloo of what's going on, i have neglected to mention last week's women's world cup. our u.s. team unbelievable. up believable. ultimately they lost in the final to japan, but their play throughout the tournament was outstanding, and as a former player and sometimes lady, the goal that they scored in injury time against brazil to tie one of the greatest goals i've ever seen in wor
after this. britain's prime minister, the latest to face tough questions in that hacking scandal. our megapanel itching to weigh in. hoe deep does it go? and is it in too? we're back after this. like "oh no, i cannot do investing." next thing you know he's got a stunning portfolio. shhhh, you're welcome. [ male announcer ] e-trade. investing unleashed. energy is being produced to power our lives. while energy developement comes with some risk, north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing decades of cleaner burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet below fresh water sources within self contained well systems and using state of the art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment we are america's natural gas. yeah, let's check out the horses under the hood! show me the carfax. show me the carfax. horsepower, foxpower, same thing. just show me the carfax. before you buy a used car, get a carfax vehicle history report. see accidents and service r
. britain couple tom's cabin to try to prevent that. unfortunately in effect it made slavery more entrenched because it made this out very defensive about slavery, even as it turned the north toward antislavery. so it had this effect. it startled her. some became more better. petitions to politicians. she was mentioned in political speeches. it was really a growing division so finally win don brown comes along, even though she had created it gentle on "tom she calls john brown in 1869 the greatest american that ever lived. like a former pacifist, henry david thoreau who rick -- who wrote his entire essay in his earlier years which influences more nitpicking and gondi. but henry david thoreau is greater than any of the founding fathers. there is no man who has ever lived to has done more for the honor of the american name. she knew about his violence in kansas and is violence. but by that time she knew the very sad truth that only violence was going to end slavery. it took the death of more than 620,000 americans to end slavery. that is how deeply entrenched slavery had become in america. sad
in the united states when they subpoena people, it's similar in great britain. parliament has issued the equivalent of subpoena to her, and to rupert murdoch and his son. they've all agreed they're going to testify. what's the implication of that? >> well, she's a british citizen, so she has to get there, go there, and she has to testify. she's said she would appear in front of that parliamentary committee. she's going to answer tough questions, what did she know, when did she know it and does she personally bear any responsibility for what happened. she was editor at the time when a teenager was new murdered ands of the world was deleting voicemail messages that for a brief time allowed her parents to believe she was alive. that's really what set this whole thing off. this woman was editor at the time. she's got tough questions to answer, but this whole scandal is by no means over, both in this country and in the united states. it has rocked the relationship between the police, the media, the politicians, and it's uncovering some pretty dirty, uncomfortable messy stuff that's hangin
in britain may bh saying it's just the tip of the iceberg. two more murdoch newspapers are now being implicated by a former british prime minister. what are the latest allegations, becky, out there today. >> it's quite remarkable. if rupert murdoch thought he was going to draw a line under this by jetting in this weekend and closing down "the news of the world" he got another thing coming today. three strands to this story. and if you blinked, wolf, let me tell you, you missed part of this story today. the most of the important, probably coming from the office of gordon brown, the former prime minister. allegations that other papers in the news international stable, and of course "the news of the world" was part of that stable, may have illegally blogged information on him and on his family. it was a tweet from his wife today saying so sad to learn all about my family's privacy is very personal. he's not saying he was hacked into as one paper reports. what he is saying is that journalists and/or private investigators from the sun newspaper and or the sunday times newspaper, and that'
murdoch's newspapers in great britain are being called out for allegedly breemping the privacy of everyone, from the former prime minister to the queen of england. murdoch himself along with his son and one of his top editors are being called by the british government to explain themselves. dan rivers, she in london. and, dan, tell us about this. it seems to go all the way at the top of newscorp. i understand we just lost dan. we're going it try to get back to dan as quickly as we can to bring you the very latest. i understand now we have dan. dan, can you hear me? dan? can you hear me? >> reporter: yes, i can hear you fine. >> dan, tell us about how high up this goes? we understand that now murdoch himself is expected to explain this mess to parliament? >> reporter: well, i think that the kind of million dollar question is, you know, how high up does this go? did james murdoch know about all this nefarious practices in news international? he has consistently maintained he knew nothing about it at all be shgs and equally rupert murdoch his father and his boss also says he was completely un
and a stiff upper lip. you've pretty much summed up the day in britain's parliament and rupert murdoch's phone hacking scandal. he and his son james and former news corp. executive rebekah brooks were grilled today. the elder murdoch apologizing but refusing to take the rap. >> do you feel that ultimately you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> nope. >> you're not responsible? who is responsible? >> the people that i trusted to run it. and then maybe the people they trusted. >> no apology and no stepping down. >> have you considered resigning? >> >> no. >> why not? >> because i feel that people i trusted, not saying who, i don't know what level. have let me down. and i think they have behaved disgracefully and betrayed the company and me. and it's for them to pay. i think that frankly i'm the best person to clean this up. >> and speaking of cleaning up, the proceedings were interrupted briefly when a protestor deliver a shaving cream pie. take a look at this. keep your eye on the lower left-hand corner of your screen. it happens pretty quickly. >> oh! >> here it is quickly again in slow
tied to the tabloid phone hacking scandal in britain. lawmakers here at home in the u.s. are calling for their own investigation. we're going to have details on that. do you know how to secure your cell phone to prevent people from hacking it? we're going to run through four things you need to know to keep hackers at bay. >> also this morning, daniel radcliffe will be here, the star, of course of the wildly successful "harry potter" franchise and the final film is opening tomorrow. it has already set the record for advanced ticket sales and he'll be opening up about the series as it comes to an end and a personal issue that he struggled with. >>> we want to begin with the chilling confession from the alleged killer of an 8-year-old in new york city. jeff rossen has details on that. some of the details are disturbing, jeff. >> reporter: this sure are. good morning to you. this young boy, 8-year-old boy asked his parents over and over again, can i please walk home from summer camp all by himself. parents finally said yes. they rehearsed the route, only about seven blocks, chose a halfw
the greater transparency and the stronger governance we need in britain's policing. let me turn to the specific questions i have been asked in recent days. first, it has been suggested that my chief of staff was behaving wrongly when he didn't take up the commissioneruate's offer to be briefed on police investigations. i have said repeatedly about the police investigation they should pursue the evidence where ever it leads and arrest exactly who they wish. that is exactly what they have done. number ten is the exchange between my chief of staff and john yates. the reply to the police made clear it would not be appropriate to give me or my staff any privileged briefing. the reply that he sent -- the reply that he sent was cleared in advance by my permanent secretary jeremy hayward. just imagine mr. speaker if they had done the opposite. if they had asked for receiving privileged information, even if there is no intention to use it. there would have been justified outrage. to risk any perception that number ten was seeking to influence a police investigation in any way would have
. >>> this morning, tabloid hacking scandal rages on in britain, rupert murdoch is back in the united states while his company is making plans just in case has scandal spreads across the atlantic. jeff glor is back in london with more this morning on the latest with this story. good morning again, jeff. >> chris, good morning to you from london. >> reporter: you know rupert murdoch spent decades building up his media empire and now he is doing everything he can to try to preserve it. rupert murdoch arrived back in new york last night. hoping the newspaper scandal that has consumed britain doesn't envelope his american interests. as owner of the "wall street journal" and more. now an fbi probe is officially under way looking into whether murdoch employees maid investigators to hack into the voice mails of 9/11 victims. this as the directors of news corp. beginning hiring former u.s. attorney mary jo white and former attorney general michael mukasey. >> it's hard to know what kind of jeopardy they are in because we don't know all of the facts. in connection with any bribes that were paid in england.
moving here to britain and then to the u.s. right now he's doing everything he can to try to preserve it. >> reporter: rupert murdoch arrived back in new york last night. hoping the newspaper scandal that's consumed britain doesn't also envelop his american interests or influence. as owner of "the wall street journal," the "new york post" and more murdoch watched his company shares swoon when the phone hacking allegations struck, and then stabilize. now an fbi probe is officially under way looking into whether murdoch employees paid investigateors to hack into the voice mails of 9/11 victims. this as the directors of news corp begin hiring former u.s. attorney mary jo white and former attorney general michael mucasey. >> it is unclear at this point how much jeopardy they are potentially in because we simply don't know all the facts. they are potentially subject to prosecution under a statute called the foreign corrupt practices act in connection with any bribes that were paid in england. >> reporter: here in england, the ever-expanding list of influential fig
new moon ritual. paganism has just been given the status of a religion in britain. and it's growing. some say there are 250,000 followers. so many that british police have issued guidelines for officers should they stumble upon something like this. >> some ceremonies include a blindfolded, naked participant whose hands may be bound. this is in accordance with ritual and has the full consent of the participant. >> reporter: does that happen? >> that relates to one particular ritual which you could find in some groups. it's an initiation rite is what it is. they're going through a death and a rebirth. >> reporter: simon was reborn 11 years ago. his wife used to be involved too. but they've got a kid now and sometimes it's hard to find a sitter. this is a large, large part of your life. >> yes. >> i ask that i may receive the blessing of the element of water. >> reporter: okay, so what is paganism? well, it's pre-christian, and basically, it's the worship of the land, animals, spirits and ancient gods. >> there's more and more people getting more involved. >> why?? >> i think it's beca
: this scandal is nothing less than an earthquake, sending tremors to the highest levels of power in britain. the people of this country shocked to learn that for the last 30 years, murdoch and his executives have been dictating policy to the politicians and the police. the murdochs certainly had the ear of britain's prime minister. in 15 months, david cameron has had 26 meetings with murdoch executives. more than twice the number of meetings he's had with any other news organization. how powerful was rupert murdoch here in britain? >> immensely powerful. the view of every prime minister for r e last 30 years is that no one can get elected without the blessing of the patriarch. >> reporter: it is now not clear that either murdoch can survive this crisis. news corporation shares have tumbled. if the company faces criminal charges, it could be forced to unload some of its most lucrative holdings in the u.s. including fox tv.ç this really is a dynasty on the brink. jeffrey kofman, abc news, london. >> what a drama. and kind of an ironic twist. some of the paper's websites w
britain. it's a tough one. i mean -- it's always going to be -- i'm always going to have to answer that and deal with that question because of where i grew up and it's -- i regard myself as northern irish that's all i can really say. >> that's probably the diplomatic answer as well. >> yeah. have to be. >> did you have a tough upbringing, would you say? >> no. >> did you have much money as a family? >> no, no, not at all. my mom and dad worked very hard to give me the best chance not just in golf but in life. i was an only child. my dad worked three jobs at one stage. my mom worked night shifts in a factory. >> what did they do? >> my dad was a bar manager and worked in separate places, in the daytime, then at the night. my mom work in a factory that produced tape and sort of industrial goods and she worked night shift in there. so they worked very hard. and i -- being so young, you're sort of oblivious to it all. it is only when you become a little older and a little wiser that you realize how much they sacrificed for you. >> it's been worth it though, hasn't it? >> yeah. yeah. bu
. >> no, no, no. oh. things are tight in britain between anti-rupert -- we'll have the latest on that. >> did you ever cheat in school. >> i never cheated on a test but homework. >> yes to be honest. >> john stossel on cheating and charles krauthammer on what happens if sarah palin enters the presidential race. caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone, the factor begins right now. captions by closed captioning services >> bill: hi, i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. does big business fear president obama? that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. first of all, i'm not going to report all the minutia surrounding the debt debate. most of it is nonsense and doesn't affect you at all. most in government believe some debt deal will get done. that's speculation if anything concrete happens the factor will report it immediately. even if the debt ceiling is raised, and the feds drastically cut spending, the economy will remain at risk. that's because some american business people fear president obama's policies and are not hiring or investing as a resu
scandal involving rupert murdoch media hold ntion great britain. editors are believed to have hacked into the phones and records of former prime minister gordon brown shown here on an official visit to the u.s. and even members of the royal family. latest reports also accuse police of accepting bribes from journalist working for different publications owned by murdoch news corporation great britain. phone hacking scandal has scuffled news corporation plans to take over british sky broadcasting and in 2006 shortly after scotland yard began the initial criminal inquirey of phone hacking 5 senior police investigators discovered that their mobile phones had been targeted. >> if health news about salt tonight. new study from the center for disease control and prevention found that those most at risk of high bloop from too much salt intake may be those who eat too little potassium in fact. twice as likely to die from heart attack as people who eat the same amount of both nutrient in their diet t.researchers think potassium rich foods such as bonanza a, broccoli and spinach may help neu
. >>> there is now a death that could be connected to the phone hacking scandal in britain. it comes as the scandal spreads taking down some of london's top cops. >> reporter: the reporter who blew the whistle on alleged phone hacking at the news of the world has been found dead at his home in england. sean horn's death does not appear to be suspicious. the development comes on the same day as senior london police officer resigned. assistant commissioner john yates decided not to reopen an investigation two years ago into allegations the paper was tapping phones. >> i have acted with complete integrity and my conscious is clear. >> reporter: yates' registration resignation comes in the heels of the police chief stepping down monday. he's cutting his trip to south africa short as he trys to convince the public the investigation will be conducted. brooks was arrested over the weekend and released on jail. she spent hours answering questions about what she knew about hacking while she was in charge. >> she is not guilty of any criminal offense. >>> police have arrested at least 10 people in connecti
ago may have had their phones hacked by a britain tabloid. the latest escalation in a growing scandal over phone hackings by "news of the world." >> the london police confirmed some of its may have gotttt cash from the paper in exchange for confidential information. >>> three former pta moms from los angeles have been arrested after duping fellowarents into investing $14 million in a phony business. the alleged ponzi scheme lasted more than two years during which that time they spent a aut 3 million -- the three spent millions on vacation, cars and also gambling trips before an irate investor alerted authorities. the women are now being held on multiple felony charges. >>> attorneys name more than a dozen hihi-profile witnesses to be called in the perjury trial of roger clememe beginning later today. he is accused of lying to congress about taking performance-enhancing drugs. >>> staying with sports this morning, here's don bell at espn news with last night's highlights. >>> hey there, i'm don bell with your espn news update. one of the best players in the game returns to the st. loui
was unveiled in london. british foreign secretary william hague called him one of the truest friends britain has ever had. >> what would the 4th of july be without the nathan's hot dog eating contest on coney island. >> there were two champions left standing. as randall pinkston reports, one of them barely weighs 100 pounds. >> it is a 4th of july tradition. who can eat the most hot dogs and buns in ten minutes at the annual nathan's hot dog eating contest. >> it is joey chester. ajoey chestnut downed 62 hot dogs, chewing his way to the top for the fifth time in a row. for the first time ever, nathan's held a separate mens and women's event. 100 pound sonya thomas sucked down 40 hot dogs to win the inaugural women's competition. thomas is known in the competitive eating world as the black widow. she took part in the contest when it was co-ed. she supports the separation. >> one of the greatest all-time hot dog eating champions here on coney island did not compete this year. he has a contract dispute but some spectators suspect something else was keeping him away. >> i think he's afraid to lo
thank you and good-bye from britain's best-selling tabloid, the latest fallout from the phone hacking scandal on "morning joe." somewhere in america, there's a doctor who can peer into the future. there's a nurse who can access in an instant every patient's past. and because the whole hospital's working together, there's a family who can breathe easy, right now. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest healthcare questions. and the over 60,000 people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. >>> 47 past the hour. after weeks of controversy, resignations and arrests, britain's "news of the world" published its last issue on sunday. it comes as its rooival, "the mirror," claims today that a new york police officer asked for voice mails of 9/11 victims. stephanie gosk reports on the "news of the world's" demise and its final day. >> with the ink barely dry on the final edition of news of the world, 80-year-old media baron rupert murdoch traveled to the uk to do damage control. on display, his unqualified support of melissa brooks. smiles for
, thank you and good- bye. that's the final message from britain's best selling tabloid as it shuts down in the midst of the phone hacking scandal. after 168 years, the very last edition of the news of the world is now going to press. the tabloid is closing after several of its reporters were caught hacking into the voice mails of celebrities, even missing children. several arrests have now been made in that case. >>> prince william became a star of a polo match in california tonight. william led a team to victory with four goals. spectators paid at least $400 a ticket to get a close-up view of the royal couple. duchess kate presented the trophy to her husband following the match. tonight, the pair continued their california trip with a black-tie dinner that honors british actors and filmmakers. >>> an underground discovery leads researchers to a piece of civil war history. tonight as gigi barnett explains, it is right in the heart of lafayette square in west baltimore. >> reporter: below the layers of dirt is an archaeologists goldmine. >> it is like christmas every day digging in the d
, breaking news this morning as rupert murdoch's right hand in great britain resigned over the newspaper hacking scandal. the question is what will the fbi uncover in its new investigation of murdoch's media empire here in the states. >>> today is the day for all your harry potter kids and adults who read books about boy sorcerers. the question is how long have you been camping out for opening night of "harry potter and the deathly hallows" part two? it's way too early for this.
-hacking scandal hits a new boiling point in britain with the arrest of one of rupert murdoch's top executives. and the resignation also of england's top cop. the question this morning is, could this scandal lead to the breakup of murdoch's empire? >>> and if you like me were watching all that soccer over the weekend, the question is, did any country deserve to win this more than japan? it's "way too early" for this.
scandal that has already brought down one of britain's largest newspapers. former news international ceo rebekah brooks, one of rupert murdoch's most trusted executives was just released on bail after reportedly facing 12 hours of questioning at a london police station. brooks had been heading the british arm of murdoch's news corp. media division when she stepped down last friday. a spokesperson says brooks turned herself in and she's cooperating with police, but continues to deny any wrongdoing. >>> and then late last night london's police commissioner abruptly resigned, paul stephenson announced he was leaving his post amid allegations that his united, which was investigating this scandal, was corrupt and had close ties with the former executive editor of news international's now defunct "news of the world." nbc's stephanie gosk with the latest from london. >> reporter: london's police chief resigned under intense pressure after it emerged scotland yard hired a former "news of the world" editor as a media consultant in 2009. the same year investigators decided not to further pursue th
, there might be a lot of fire. >> they responded this morning to great britain. they responded by obviously the closure of the -- >> yeah, obviously. >> they responded. >> but now the times. >> they responded in great britain too. i think their fear -- and i think it's a legitimate fear, growing, increasing fear with each and every passing day does jump the pond. does this come here? >> does this come to america? >> yeah. >> they put out a statement this morning that was very unnews corp. like saying they're concerned about the allegations of gordon brown and they're pursuing him and that's the game. so there's no -- these are outrageous, outlandish. >> "new york times" says the murdoch family is in a bunker according to one person close to the company. >> wow. >> hunker down. >> so that's the next question. i'm sure it's out on the websites. wanting to investigate american companyings. >> "new york post," fox news. >> yeah. >> sure they're -- yeah. >> let's get to sports. >> all right. let's do a little sports, shall we? no baseball last night. it's the all-star break, but they did have th
? >> britain is not in the euro and while i am prime minister, it will never be in the euro so we should not be involved in those internal arrangements. only eurozone countries were involved. only eurozone countries have been involved about further bailouts. it is right not to use the european financial stability mechanism for future support to greece. >> what discussions did he have about preparing for that the fault? in particular with the president who has said in the context of departure from the euro and the devolution of the monetary union, it does not have to be disorderly. >> what is causing disorder as instability in europe. it is the fact that cannot be changed. if greece can default. good money will be wasted failure of greece. why wasn't the prime minister your normal skeptical self and lead an orderly withdrawal? >> checks seem to be a it endangers species sincethey were in terminal decline. the council said there is no alternative. the council did not look too happy when they came before the treasury committee. >> it is a imperative as working to have a viable set of of tre
accused of illegally invading the privacy of britain's former prime minister as this hacking scandal widens. we're live from london ahead. >> i'm ali velshi. much of the country literally feeling the heat and relief from the summer scotcher may be days away on this "american morning." >>> and good morning to you. thanks so much for being with us on this "american morning." it's tuesday, july 12th. christine has the morning off. >> we've got a lot of news this morning, including some breaking news out of afghanistan. >> that's right. we begin there where afghan president hamid karzai's half brother was found shot to death at his home. ahmed wali karzai was the provenÇal council chief of kandahar. he suffered gunshot wounds to his head and chest according to hospital officials. a spokesman for kandahar's government said a guard killed karzai. the taliban says -- >> we've seen the worst so far. excessive heat warnings and advisories posted in 23 states. the heat in many areas could reach 115 degrees. the heat wave is being blamed for one death in madison county, illinois. in oklahoma i
breakfast today. >>> britain's duke and duchess of cambridge, better known as prince william and wife kate are in canada to celebrate the nation's 144th birthday. all along they're treated like rock stars, people lining up for hours to catch a gliches of the young couple. coming up the latest on the royal tour. >> going from here to southern california, in a few days. a whirlwind trip of north america coming up. i don't think pippa is with them. >> pippa is not with them. >> didn't travel with them for the heck of it. >> she doesn't want to steal attention from kate probably. >> i see. >> or something like that. >> that's right. victoria arbiter will be here, our pal to talk about the royal stuff. i wonder how that will be like for them. kate has never been to north america. >> first trip here. they're on camera all the time and still manage to look good no matter what. >> got the whole thing down, working it well. for some your local news is next. for others stick around. your local news is next. >>> the general motors building on this saturday, july the 2nd. welcome to "the early show."
with us. >> i'm chris wragge. there's been another development in britain's phone hacking scandal. a new arrest, a man said to be former editor of "news of the world" as pressure groiz on rupert murdoch to testify in london and possibly washington. new development every day. television deal with bsky b looks like it's -- >> out. >> -- a thing of the past. >>> with time going out, the president abruptly walked out of wednesday's meeting according to republicans. nancy cordes joins us live from capitol hill with the latest. good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you, chris. it appears that patience is wearing thin in the room where the president is meeting at the white house with eight top congressional leaders. both sides accuse the other of moving the goal posts, of failing to lead and now it appears the president has had enough. they may have been all smiles at the start of the meeting but tensions flaired after house majority leader eric cantor, republican from virginia, repeatedly proposed a series of short term extensions of the debt limit if a larger deal proved unattainable. "i
coming up later in "the situation room." meanwhile, outraged lawmakers in britain have a lot of question foss rupert murdoch. will they get answers when he and their son appeared before parliament next week. why won't republicans take what they can get in debt talks. i'll ask paul ryan about this game of chicken that's making so many americans sick. [ male announcer ] to the seekers of things which are one of a kind. the authentic, the rare, the hard to define. to those always searching for what's pure and what's real from we who believe we know just how you feel. haagen-dazs. vietnam, 1967. i got mine in iraq, 2003. u.s.a.a. auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation, because it offers a superior level of protection and because u.s.a.a.'s commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto insurance quote. u.s.a.a. we know what it means to serve. >>> casey anthony will be released from jail on sunday. as a free woman, she'll reportedly live in a secret location, likely under a new name, and according to s
. emergency responders are on the scene. >>> the phone hacking scandal in britain appears to be getting worse by the day. telephone numbers of families of soldiers killed in iraq and afghanistan have been found in the files of an investigator working for the "news of the world." on today's anniversary of the terror attack on london's transit system there are claims the paper hacked into mobile phones of families of terror victims. the paper is under fire for allegedly hacking into the phone messages of a missing teenager later found murdered. >>> a rare and deadly grizzly bear attack at yellowstone national park. park officials say a 57-year-old man and his wife were hiking yesterday and surprised a female bear and her cubs. the bear mauled the man and he died. his wife survived with cuts and bruises. >> this is the first time that there has been a bear caused human fatality in yellowstone in 25 years. >> bears have killed two other people in the area around yellowstone in just more than a year. >>> finally the perloined picasso, the drawing worth hundreds of thousands of dollars was taken tu
wedding in britain? the queen's eldest granddaughter is getting married this weekend in what will probably be a more down to earth affair. the latest on that ceremony from scotland coming up. >>> are you ready to return to the '80s? >> i still live in the '80s. >> we're really going to take you back because we have one of the most popular bands of all time standing by for a big summer concert. >> journey out on the plaza. they're going to be performing on what is a stage that is still drying out from overnight rain. we're happy about that. see them in our 8:30 half hour. >>> let's begin with the debt ceiling crisis in washington. kelly o'donnell has been covering this story. she's got the latest this morning. kelly, good morning. >> good morning, ann. from delayed to potentially derailed, is that where we are this morning? hours and hours went by overnight when house speaker john boehner and his leadership team were trying to get a handful of their own members to go along, to come together on a solution to raise the debt ceiling and to cut spending. but they are nowhere. so now we know tha
, britain never did this. we have this dominance. it may not be an empire in the usual sense of the term, but it is an extraordinary kind of dominance. and yet we're not quite sure what we should be doing. and that, i think, came out in the libyan business, and it's our hesitation in the middle east. we're not sure that this is good for us. we'll have to see. at the same time, we can't stand in the way of people wanting to be democratic. so we've had an extraordinary history, and we're live anything a very -- live anything a very, a very difficult time or a significant time too. >> let's go back and tie this to the very beginning. if we're talking about the soviet union, of course, in the case of russia they ip herted a large -- inherited a large land maas. they'd had some 800 years of history. they'd had czars that had ruled the world. in our founding, and you write about this very powerfully, and you talk about the audacity of the young americans and this little land mass at the edge of the world. and now they thought they were going to remake the world. how did that come about? what g
agents arrested 14 people in nine states as well as dc britain and netherlands accused of hacking major u.s. companies. cyber crimes were allegedly committed in retaliation for companies severing ties to wikileaks. >>> 11 minutes past the hour. we are monitoring metro for you letting you know which station has several esculators out of service. >> having trouble trimming your waistline there may be a reason why your diet is not working straight ahead. >> as we head to break let's look at 395, pentagon looks good main lanes. >> keeping an eye on your favorite summer time songs on facebook. the doobie brothers, taking it to the streets. 7:12 a.m.  >>> welcome back it is 7:15 a.m., is this going to be the hottest day this week today? >> no. >> we have another one to go? >> we have a lot to look forward to. >> yeah, we do. >> i look forward to next week. >> maybe -- maybe by next week we can -- >> is that your headline? >> take a look no relief until next week. >> oh, i guessed good guess then. >> yeah, maybe by next tuesday upper 80s. >> sounds wonderful these days. >>
constitution. they point out britain has no constitution. they have an accumulated set of practices. in that sense, that was the genius of the constitution. they understood, don't overdo it. >> let me jump to the question at the heart of the debate. the word originalism. people say we must interpret the constitution as understood by those who drafted it. a, does that make sense and then, more suddenly, how do those who drafted it understand our ability to add interpretations based upon new dynamics, facts and situations? >>> well, originalism cannot be among the concept. as fareed said, i think the three of us agree, the glory of that was the intensity of its dispute. disputes were never allowed to be so ferocious that they called, as some do, for a virtual obliteration of the other party. they did not demonize each other and say i'm the real american. you are a form of crumby european trader. they could have done it to hamilton. hamilton wanted to improve exactly as fareed says, this is going to get us in trouble. improve the british state and make it free. the british state was a
on southwest airlines? >> yes, or the sleezy jet in great britain. >> you have an airline that is called sleezy jet? >> it is nicknamed sleezy jet. along on "bleep" airlines i want screaming children. they should also go on that airline. that could leave bill and me, newly weds to be going to our honeymoon in fashion. >> is this a mixed marriage? >> it means i got a green card. >> kevin, this was an hour and 40-minute flight. couldn't he have gone an hour and 40 minutes without a cigarette? take a xanax and chill out. >> by the way, if you are going to take bill on a flight, there is no difference between him and a baby. he is always dropping turds on his feet. he stinks and you only have to look at his hair. what is up with the airlines? all i can say is they have become fashists. you get on the plane and you are told what to do every two minutes. we need to do what joe says. have an airline with know stewards and stewardesses. you bring your own booze. it is cheaper and the cabin crew locks the door and lets you get along with it. >> this flight attendant or stew which you like to call her sc
. this is a lancome makeup ad featuring julia roberts. looks good. it's been banned in great britain along with christy turlington because the images were overly air brushed. fair or unfair. talk about that coming up. >>> let's begin on thursday morning with the time ticking away to reach a deal for the debt ceiling. kelli o'donnell is our capitol hill correspondent. kelli, good morning to you. >> good morning to you. this is a test of john boehner's leadership. he delivered a blunt message to his own republican members to get in line. aides tell me they believe that was more credibility, that was their word, with some of the most conservative members when they retooled their proposal to raise the debt limit and cut spending by going deeper with the cuts, and now, after so much talk, that vote comes today. >> reporter: the politics of chronic gridlock hurts. >> i've had kidney stones that are easier to pass than this. >> reporter: and the prognosis from democrats is dire. >> the speaker's plan is on life support and it's time for him to pull the plug. >> reporter: but house speaker john bo
. >> underestimate at our zblerl he's relentless. >>> news of the world phone hacking scandal has rocked britain and so, too late-night comedy. >> former news corporation rebekah brooks was arrested over the weekend for illegal wiretapping and bribing police officers for information. you know, i don't think she's getting. she said, how much is it going to take to make this away? >> news of the world, the newspaper in london has been accused now of allegedly hacking in to phones, cell phones of other people. even the royal family. so, tonight, we have a little segment called scandalous phone call of the night. >> hello. >> big deal. who cares if the head of scotland yard resigns. why is scotland yard policing england anyway? call me when the head of england yard resigns nap's news. >> time for your political ticker with tim farley. listen, i want to show you a poll. as the clock ticks -- as we get closer to that deadline for the debt ceiling, a new cbs poll shows that 46% say that the debt ceiling should be raised. compared to 24% in june. 49% shouldn't compared to 69% in june. the president has
on the part of his enemies to tear down the entire murdock empire in britain and the united states. this is going to go a long way. >> did he give them the rope to do that? >> i don't know if he did. somebody did a lot of things wrong. evil was done, but there are people who seize upon those acts who have other agendas and other games. >> willie, it's expanding fast. 4,000 people hacked. >> it's a matter of time before the investigation here starts. senator rockefeller is going to look into it. he's going to look under a lot of stones that may cause scurrying here in the states. >> no doubt. >>> new democratic fund raising numbers released. it's one of the top stories. also ahead, we are going to talk with dr. brzezinski and governor john. bill. >>> yesterday was the hottest day of the summer in many locations. as a whole, the hottest day. it was 102 in st. louis yesterday. 97 in d.c. roll lie hit 100. some of the cooler air is working its way in. it's less humid. it's not going to be that chilly, just less humid. the exceptions from oklahoma city to dallas, memphis to atlanta thro
in articulating the media, specifically news corp. and power in great britain. is a corrupt government by definition something that can only get worse in the face of a corrupt media and are we now seeing that be revealed? >> interesting to hear rupert murdoch to describe him visy itting downing street the back door both with the previous prime minister gordon brown, the one prior to him, tony blair and the current prime minister david cameron. and on each occasion the members of parliament said, why didn't you come through the front door? and he said, because this is what the inhabitant of number 10 asked me to do. so there was clearly a very close relationship between him and each prime minister. you have to remember that this man's newspapers claimed to be able to swing elections. in 1987 after the general election, the following day, the "sun" newspaper had a front page headline which stead was the "sun "that he won it. not an exaggeration according to the view of a lot of people. he wielded enormous power. also remarkable over the last two weeks is to see all of these politicians w
to get his daughter back. he says his ex-fiancee kidnapped the girl and is now living in britain and he is fighting for his child's return. the father bart homer joins us exclusively. but first nbc's charles hadlock has more on this international custody battle. >> reporter: 2-year-old alessia was born in texas. that's about the only fact her parents can now agree on. >> just doesn't make sense. >> reporter: bart hermer still carries a pacifier in his pocket. a simple reminder of a doubter he can only see now in home videos. hermer met simone while on a singles cruise in italy and quickly fell in love. but before a wedding could be planned, alessia was born. by then, hermer had lost his job in a down economy. the couple decided to spend several months at her home in england. after a brief trip to the states, they encountered a british emigration officer on their return to the uk. simone and alessia were admitted, but because he had no job, no income, hermer was turned away. >> he accepted my passport, stamped it, said you're going home on the next flight. my mouth dropped open. >> repor
, which is actually a requirement for makeup advertisers in britain. so they can prove that the thing actually works. >>> the number of people who are seeking unemployment benefits dropped last week to the lowest level since early april. cnbc's seema mody joins with more on that and the rest of the day's business headlines. good morning. >> very good morning to you. stocks wavering as investors weighed an unexpected improvement in jobless claim numbers against the lingering threat of a u.s. credit downgrade. while the jobs market remains sluggish, the latest data on weekly initial jobless claims offered a glimmer of hope for investors. initial claims ticked down by 24,000 to 398,000 in the week ending july 23rd from a revised 422 k in the previous week. a bill to cut the u.s. deficit faces a nail-biting closed vote in congress on thursday as a top republican lawmaker fought to quell an internal debate. economic sentiment in the euro zone worsened more than expected this month with optimism fading in all sectors, data showed on thursday morning, signaling slower expansion of the econom
and said, i've got a guy that can do the very thing they're doing over in britain, what would have happened. the editor would have said, what do you think about that? let's do it. let's start with this. i've got a better idea. give me your press card. give me your keys. go down the hall and get your check and never come back. they would have kicked these guys out, which is the thing is what repels me about it because i know great british news men who would never dream of doing that, irish news men in dublin and belfast. they would never do that. >> so when you think of rupert murdoch being the guy in charge of these people and that he's in charge of papers here, what do you think? >> well, i -- if he turned a blind eye to it, if he said, i don't care how they got it, we got it, then he has to examine his own conscience because he was creating a culture of corruption, not petty corruption, not getting two tickets to a ball game or something. major corruption. he should be thinking about what he did to the craft of journalism itself. you and i know people who died practicing this profession.
in london and britain. i hope there is, for his sake. but certainly rebecca brooks, as the one running the operation there, has a responsibility, whether or not she knew. i was trying to figure out today is she more like the g. gordon liddy in the watergate era or more like matt that harrah because of all the tentacles she has going out to the press and the powerful people. >> i'm sort of surprised that -- i want to say it's a conflicting message to people, that nothing seemed to really happen, when it was just listening to hugh grant's phone conversations. and just a little bit happened when it was actually the royal family. but it was the -- when it hit common people, regular everyday people, crime victims, that seemed to change everything. why do you think that is? >> well, i think there's a sympathy factor which is understandable when you're talking about crime victim, talking about minors, talking about soldiers who have been killed. i think that's -- that strikes a sympathetic chord in most people. also, i think we look at celebrities the way we look at powerful people in general
disorder and killed someone and was locked in an insane asylum. in britain. and from that insane asylum he gave james murray tens of thousands of illustrative quotations for the oxford english dictionary. the brits consider him a star of the oed. that star of the oed is actually an american reject because simon winchester in his book, and winchester's is a breed. the brits have written history about that and my point is the americans were damn good in the 19th century and we shouldn't forget it. that winchester didn't realize that w.c. minor worked on webster's 1864 addition again i look at the correspondents, and he was the one weak link. ever says this is a fantastic dictionary. minor was supposed to do a natural history definition and they were really lousy. so the future star of the oed couldn't cut it as an american lexicographer, and i just want to highlight just how impressive that dictionary is and that we should be very proud of our tradition of the american lexicography. all right, i will stop there and take questions. [inaudible] >> all right. when we you appear on c-span? >> i'
extraordinary. britain had never did this. we have a dominance like the empire that is extraordinarily kind of dominance, and yet we are not quite sure what we should be doing and that i think is came out in devotee and business and its our hesitation in the middle east we are not sure that this is good for us. we have to see. at the same time we can't stand in the way of people wanting to be space. so, we have had an extraordinary history and in a very difficult time, significant time, too. >> let's go back and tie this to the very beginning. if we are talking about the soviet union, of course in the case of russia they've inherited a large land mass and had some 800 years of history, they have tsar's that have ruled the world. in our funding coming and you write about this very powerful the and you talk about the audacity of the young americans in this little hoot land mass at the end of the world, and somehow they thought they were going to remake the world. how did that come about? >> when you think about it this is a country of two or 3 million people, 3,000 from the civilization on th
. that's when the phone hacking scandal started gaining more momentum here in britain. that means it's wiped off about $5 billion off his market capitalization. nevertheless, the stock did rally about 5.5% yesterday as rupert murdoch and his son james gave testimony to the parliamentary select committee here in the united kingdom, spiked significantly higher when james murdoch himself made a number of comments about transparency at the company. but this has affected the value of the shares that the murdoch family own. they've lost about $750 million on their own stake. wouldn't feel too sorry for them, ali. they still own shares that are worth more than $5 billion in total. >> nobody ever wants to lose money though, do they? good to see you this morning. i'm check in with you later. let's go to jacqui jeras live in atlanta in the weather center. activity in the tropics that might be of concern to us? >> good morning. we've been watching tropical storm bret, winds about 50 miles per hour. it will stay offshore. the good news is we're not expecting this to bring showers and thunderstor
. yesterday britain's prime minister said it wasn't just foot dragging by the police. >> the truth is, to coin a phrase, we've all been in this together, the press, the politicians and leaders of all the passes, yes, including me. >> reporter: while "the news of the world" will print its last edition tomorrow, the fallout from this affair has just begun. on the business side, a multibillion-dollar takeover bid by the murdoch family of a huge satellite television operation here in britain has already been delayed and it could be in serious trouble. russ? >> elizabeth palmer in london, thank you. >>> and joining us from london is steve eulitz and mark lewis, lawyer for the family of 13-year-old milly dowler whose phone was hacked after her murder, the incident that ignited the scandal. nothing is going to bring back their little girl but is the dowler family getting any satisfaction by the fact that "news of the world" is closing? >> there's no really satisfaction. it was cruelty upon cruelty that the announcement of "news of the world" was ceasing without them being warned about this, they tend
america and britain is this, that the tightness of the establishment in britain is just -- it's just such a different thing. i lived and worked in london for a number of years and people here can't really get their head around what a small incestuous world it is. a much smaller world where a small city runs, media, all went to one of two colleges and everybody knows each other. in this case, the complicity of the establishment, the political establishment, the journalistic establishment, the law enforcement establishment, hoe they are all in one way or another were in on this is in some ways the bigger story than murdoch himself. it was the culture that created this entire environment. >> exactly. >> chuck, another "time" article. "conspiracy of two." >> we got the wrong guy. >> oh, it's cantor now. >> actually, he's on the other side. >> exactly. so let's talk about what's going on on capitol hill. they're back and forth. we've been saying here, republicans need to step forward with a deal. at the same time, the democrats haven't put a budget together. this is a mess. how does it ge
mcconnell talk about the ongoing debt ceiling negotiations. earlier, britain and obama nominated richard carter dougherty to head the bureau launching this week. he served as ohio's attorney general in the past. the nominee has to be approved by the senate. from the rose garden at the white house, this is just under 10 minutes. pff>> good afternoon, everybody. it has been almost three years since the financial crisis pulled the economy into a deep recession. and millions of families are still hurting because of it. they're trying to get by on one income instead of two, on fewer shifts at the plant or at the hospital. they're cutting expenses, giving up on a family night out so there's money for groceries. and for a lot of families, things were tough even before the recession. so we've got to get the economy growing faster and make sure that small businesses can hire again, so that an entrepreneur out there can sell a new product, so that the middle class is getting stronger again, and so folks feel confident in their futures and their children's futures. that's why we can't let politics
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